Nanofibers and electrospinning with stem cells for osteoarthritis treatment

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Nanofibers and electrospinning with stem cells for osteoarthritis treatment



Spiro writing for the Johns Hopkins University reported on a study that showed a spun 3-D scaffold of nanofibers did a better job of producing larger quantities of and a more durable type of the cartilage protein than flat, 2-D sheets of fibers did.
Researchers from Johns Hopkins created a nanofiber-based network using a process called electrospinning, which entails shooting a polymer stream onto a charged platform, and added chondroitin sulfate — a compound commonly found in many joint supplements — to serve as a growth trigger. Jennifer Elisseeff and her team watched the cells grow and found that compared to cells growing without scaffold, these cells developed into more voluminous, cartilage-like tissue.
“The nanofibers provided a platform where a larger volume of tissue could be produced,” says Elisseeff, adding that three-dimensional nanofiber scaffolds were more useful than the more common nanofiber sheets for studying cartilage defects in humans.
They implanted the nanofiber scaffolds into damaged cartilage in the knees of rats, and compared the results to damaged cartilage in knees left alone.
They found that the use of the nanofiber scaffolds improved tissue development and repair as measured by the production of collagen, a component of cartilage.
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